• Ceramic Tile
    • Granite
    • Limestone
    • Marble
    • Sandstone
    • Terrazzo
    • Travertine
  • Common natural stones include marble, granite, travertine, limestone
    and sandstone. We also clean and restore terrazzo flooring and ceramic
    tile and grout. Learn more about your natural stone surface and see how great it can look.
  • Limestone
    Limestone is classified as a marble. It is a smooth looking tile and does not have much, if any, graining, veining or crystal formations. It can contain lime from seawater and small evidence of fossils within the tile. Limestone usually has a honed finish and will not polish to a high shine like a marble. Colors can vary but most are earth tones.
  • Limestone
  • Limestone
  • Marble
    Marble is one of the most beautiful and expensive floor coverings made. It is a metamorphic stone. Metamorphic stones occur when a stone metamorphoses (changes) from one type of stone through extreme heat, pressure and minerals into another type of stone. The change causes crystal formations within the stone. The texture and color of the stone also will change during this process. The resulting colors of the marble are a result of the minerals mixed with the calcite and dolomite. Marble stones range in many colors and usually show lots of veining throughout the stone. The veins are actually faults in the stone.
  • Marble
  • Marble
  • Granite
    A very hard, granular, crystalline, igneous rock consisting of quartz, mica, and feldspar is often used for flooring, outside building fascia, counter tops, showers, bar tops, fireplaces and walls. Most lighter colored granites are porous and should be sealed. Because granite is extremely hard, dense and resistant to scratches and acid etching, we often use granite for floors in commercial buildings and for our counter/bar tops at home and in restaurants. Hundreds of varieties of granite exist. The pigment of granite which consists of spots of color surrounded by bands of other colors, can be light colored and dark colored, or have small and large coarse grains running throughout the stone. The colors are typically uniform throughout the stone.
  • Granite
  • Sandstone
  • Terrazzo
    Terrazzo comes from the Italian word “terrace” or “terrazza” which refers to 15th century Venetian workers who would put marble chips left over from sculpture carving into cement that was ground and polished to make tiles. Terrazzo floors of today contain about 30% cement mixed with 70% marble, granite, glass and any other substance that is hard, decorative and can be ground and polished. While not a natural stone tile, terrazzo tiles and floors can be ground and honed much like a marble, granite, travertine or limestone. These floors can also be left just honed and have floor finishes (waxes) applied to them. Some terrazzo floors are also made from an epoxy (plastic) instead of cement. The cement-based terrazzo is very porous and should be sealed to protect it from staining. Designs and colors range greatly along with the size of the tiles or panels.
  • Terrazzo
  • Terrazzo
  • Travertine
    Travertine is most commonly used in flooring, showers, counter tops and walls. It is a very soft and porous stone. Colors are mostly earth tones. Travertine will contain holes throughout the tile that are caused from years of water flowing through the stone. These holes (especially in floors) are filled with either a cement of epoxy resin. Travertine used for walls are not always filled which makes it easier to identify. Travertine is classified as a limestone which is classified as a marble.
  • Travertine
  • Ceramic Tile
  • Ceramic Tile
  • How to test and see if you have a natural stone floor
    A quick way to determine if you have a marble tile is to perform an acid etch test. Place a small amount of white vinegar on a small inconspicuous area of your tile or stone using an eye dropper. If it fizzes that is a good indication that you are dealing with a natural stone like marble. Once you wipe away that small area with the vinegar on it, you should see a dull or etched area on the stone as well. Granite will not be affected by an acid test. Marble is a very soft stone and can be easily scratched with a knife or key. Perform this test in an inconspicuous area of the stone. You can also send us digital photos of your stone and we can assist in the identification!
  • Mid-Atlantic Office
    6113 Biltmore Ave
    Baltimore, MD 21215
    (410) 764-9260
    yraskas@gmail.com
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